Rural China is peppered with small, hardworking towns that most Americans would never think to visit. However, if you never stopped by the small village of Qibao in Southeast China, you’d really be missing out. This tiny water village is known for its street food. It may be some of the best in the world. 

Even if you’re not familiar with Chinese cuisine, you won’t be able to deny just how delicious this looks. WOW.

At first, this little village might not look like much…

Just like this “beggar chicken.” A whole chicken is wrapped in a mud shell, then baked.

Or how about some skewers of lamb, beef, giblets and fried chicken? And “fake duck” tofu rolls?

Known as malatang in China, these skewers of giblets, tofu, seaweed knots and mushrooms are dunked in spicy soup and eaten out of paper containers.

Would you care for some fresh fruit punch? Or gelatin?

Delicious.

A huge chunk of salt is hollowed out, filled with hundreds of quail eggs. Then, this big cooker salts and cooks them through at the same time.

All of these squares are sticky rice cakes. They are all different flavors, like red bean, durian and Chinese medicinal herbs.

These little baskets have steamed brown rice, dates, prunes and raisins in them.

Meat skewers, Chinese fries and fermented tofu squares are fired on these grills.

Some of it may be stinky, but any fried food is good food.

Marinated pork legs could be bought whole. After being purchased, they’re chopped up so they can be eaten right out of the bag.

Love crab? What about fried, crunchy crab with mayo and lettuce?

Thankfully, these dogs weren’t for eating. They were being sold on the street as adorable little pets.

For some reason, I want to eat every single piece of street food in this village (even if it looks totally gross). Some of the best experiences in the world are the ones you don’t read about in magazines. This little village’s food would have to be one of those experiences. 

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